Vetus Latina Iohannes

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Available

Editors

  • Philip Burton
  • Jon Balserak
  • Hugh Houghton
  • David Parker

Description

From the project website (accessed 2016-03-01):

This electronic edition of the Old Latin manuscripts of St John's Gospel is the initial stage of a full edition of the Old Latin materials for this Gospel in the series Vetus Latina. Die Reste der Altlateinischen Bibel nach Petrus Sabatier neu gesammelt und herausgegeben von der Erzabtei Beuron. The second stage consists of the collection and addition of patristic citations of the Gospel. This division was adopted for two reasons. The first is that the Gospels are unique in the Old Latin Bible, in that the main text-types are represented by extant manuscripts and not by citations. The transcriptions (and their apparatus) thus provide a framework to which the citations may then be added. The second reason is more pragmatic: the rules with regard to length and size of project of the Arts and Humanities Research Board, which funded both this work and its continuation, are such that the preparation of the full edition required to be split into two stages. The transcribing and editing of the manuscripts made a suitable first stage with its own worthwhile results.
The Verbum Project, as we called it, began in October 2002 and ran for three years within what was then the Centre for the Editing of Texts in Religion (now the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing) in the Department of Theology and Religion, University of Birmingham. Although free-standing, it built upon and shared ideas with the Principio Project, whose goals included a similar electronic edition of the Greek majuscule manuscripts of John. The project was directed by David Parker, while Jon Balserak and Philip Burton worked full-time on the project, the latter having responsibility for the practical decision-making. They produced the bulk of the transcriptions, although Hugh Houghton (who was working on a doctoral thesis more closely related to the patristic citations) and David Parker also made contributions. The production of the electronic edition and most of the proofreading have been undertaken by Hugh Houghton.
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